Home > Discipleship, Leadership > Exponential Leadership: The Difference Between Ministering to People and Ministering Through People

Exponential Leadership: The Difference Between Ministering to People and Ministering Through People

One of the fundamental differences between a worker and a leader is that a worker knows how to get stuff done, while a leader not only knows how to get stuff done, but also how to train other people to get stuff done. As one leadership proverb summarizes, “a leader is not someone who can do the work of 10, it is someone who can train 10 to do the work.”

This might sound antithetical, but the truth is that most would be leaders sideline themselves by getting in their own way.  Upcoming leaders are people who know how to get work done well. The only reason they are potential candidates for leadership in the first place is because they know what it takes to get results.

Catalyst or Bottleneck?

The problem is that the more work a person gets done, the more work there is to do. Good results typically yield more opportunities, which in turn leads to more work.  As this pattern continues a potential leader ends up finding himself with more work to accomplish than he can do alone. If he doesn’t train up more leaders he will eventually hinder his own progress.

I learned this first hand as a volunteer chaplain on my college football team. As a freshman I was one of only three Christians on a team of more than one hundred.  Bothered by this, the two other Christians and I decided that we, by God’s grace, were going to change that. We started preaching the gospel to our teammates before games and after practices and we made it a point to spend as much time discipling our teammates as we could.

Within three years God used our efforts to bring thirty teammates into the ministry.  About eight of them became authentic followers of Jesus. We now had a problem.  There were more people to disciple than the three of us had time for. We had a choice.  We could either bottleneck everything by trying to disciple everyone or we could multiply our efforts by training the new converts to disciple their teammates as we discipled them.

We chose the latter and it made all the difference.  Five years after we started God had used the ministry to gather at times sixty of our teammates.  Another half dozen or more were won to faith in Christ and a third generation of leaders were developed.

From Ministering To, To Ministering Through

This kind of impact would simply not have been possible if the three of us had tried to disciple everyone on our own. It was simply the result of equipping the next generation and then empowering them to do the work with us.  In fact, the results we saw came mainly from the second and third generation of leaders.  The original three had little to no direct involvement in the remaining 50.  We simply invested in the first 10 or so.

The apostle Paul says something similar in 2 Timothy 2:1-2.  He tells an upcoming leader named Timothy to be “strengthened by the grace that is in Christ Jesus” and to entrust the teaching he received from Paul to reliable men who would be able to teach others also. Here we see four generations of leaders: Paul, Timothy, reliable men and others.  Paul exponentially multiplied his disciple-making efforts by ministering through Timothy to others, rather than ministering to others himself. 

Image via harvestwaterlooregion.ca

Image via harvestwaterlooregion.ca

In order to become more effective leaders, we must intentionally transition from ministering to people to ministering through people. A good leader adds, a great leader multiplies. This means instead of trying to disciple everyone we must intentionally disciple a few that we can equip and empower to disciple others. Ministering to people will add more people to your ministry.  Ministering through people will exponentially multiply your disciple-making efforts. 

Advertisements
  1. November 17, 2014 at 8:41 AM

    Awesome analysis there, Pastor. thanks for sharing.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: