Home > Discipleship > Discipleship for the Rest of Us

Discipleship for the Rest of Us

When it comes to discipleship, most people I know seem to picture either a membership class or a new convert discussing basic doctrine with a pastor while sipping hot beverages at a local coffee shop. Discipleship is viewed more as an activity than a way of life. In many cases, we commonly assume that discipleship is something that we can graduate from.  We consider it a season we go through when we should consider it a lifestyle.

The result is that we have a lot of Christians who aren’t going anywhere or doing anything.  Many of our churches are filled with people who have been believers for decades, but who also haven’t grown much spiritually in the same amount of time. Sure, we can show up, pay our tithe and recite some basic creeds, but as a whole we’re neither progressing in our faith nor doing much to help others move along in theirs. The pastor is expected to do the heavy lifting, while the members are just along for the ride.

Discipleship is for Everyone

It’s time that we get rid of the silly notion that discipleship is best left to the experts. The Lord’s first disciples were not religious teachers with Bible degrees and seminary certificates, they were fisherman, tax collectors, misfits and trouble-makers.  They were ordinary people, like you and I.  If God can use these uneducated, ordinary people (Acts 4:13) to turn the world upside down (Acts 17:6), then why can’t he do the same with us?  He can!

Discipleship doesn’t have to be complicated.  In fact, it’s more effective when it’s simple.  It doesn’t require fancy programs, a formal seminary education or even a five step process.  All it takes is a willingness to follow Jesus in the community of God’s people.

When it comes down to it, discipleship is simply learning to believe in and follow Jesus through intentional relationships over time. This can happen in several ways: one-to-one conversations, small group discussions, in a casual way through your hobbies, in a formal way through meals together and training programs and even as you’re on the go. In other words, discipleship is simply leveraging every human connection to move people closer to Jesus before, during and after their conversion, one interaction at a time.

Image via borizs.com

Image via borizs.com

I like what Rick Warren (Pastor of Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California) says about this.  Pastor Rick’s church has grown to tens of thousands based on one simple discipleship concept.  He tells his people to find what they enjoy doing, then to do it with non-believers.

The idea is that as Christ-followers enjoy time with non-believers their faith and lifestyle will “rub off” on the non-Christians they interact with.  This then provides opportunities to talk with them about Jesus, invite them into our lives and bring them into the community of believers.  Before long, non-believers are hearing about Jesus, experiencing Jesus and participating in small groups and services that teach them to believe in and submit to Jesus. It’s really that simple.

Becoming Like Jesus With Others

Ultimately, discipleship is learning to pattern your life after Jesus. He stepped out of heaven and spent his time making the Father accessible to humanity by doing life with those who were far from God. He then sacrificed himself on a cross so that we could personally know and live for God through him. (2 Corinthians 5:14-15) If we want to make a difference it’s as simple as making Jesus accessible to others by doing life with them. This can be done in everything from formal small group Bible discussions to casual conversations while watching Monday Night football.

This is how Jesus made God known to us.  This is how we can make Jesus known to others. We don’t have to leave discipleship to the experts.  We can each have a tremendous impact if we’ll simply learn to repurpose our daily activities for the glory of God.

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  1. November 6, 2014 at 10:21 AM

    I liked your start. I agree that there are few churches that produce in their membership an every increasing maturity in Christ. By the end of your post I was more dubious. You see discipleship as leveraging people into Christianity. I think of our contacts with other people as a continual check on our ability to be more like Christ. Also, it sounds somewhat like you are the one that has something they need but you have no need of anything from others. I hope that isn’t really your attitude. We can generally receive some reminder of God’s grace when we look at people as more than opportunities for pushing our agenda.

    You might check out my post “Some Keys to Christian Maturity.” It is based on Hebrews 6.

  2. November 18, 2014 at 12:42 PM

    Reblogged this on The Proverbs 31 Club and commented:
    This just goes to show how necessary it is to learn from others.

  3. November 20, 2014 at 10:57 PM

    I agree that discipleship is where so many churches struggle. People won’t grow by hearing a salvation message every week. Once you bring someone to the Lord you want to help them grow so they become mature believers and can, in turn, minister to others.

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